+1 if you like poetry.

Friday, August 19, 2011

Sonnet 1 by William Shakespeare

FROM fairest creatures we desire increase,
That thereby beauty's rose might never die,
But as the riper should by time decease,
His tender heir might bear his memory;
But thou, contracted to thine own bright eyes,
Feed'st thy light's flame with self-substantial fuel,
Making a famine where abundance lies,
Thyself thy foe, to thy sweet self too cruel.
Thout that are now the world's fresh ornament
And only herald to the gaudy spring,
Within thine own bud buriest thy content
And, tender churl, mak'st waste in niggarding.
Pity the world, or else this glutton be,
To eat the world's due, by the grave and thee.

by William Shakespeare

some william shakespeare books you can buy.
  1. Twelve Plays by Shakespeare
  2. A Midsummer Night's Dream
  3. A Midsummer Night's Dream (Wordsworth Classics) (Wadsworth Collection)
  4. Othello
wil. shakespeare




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11 comments:

  1. Gonna risk getting some hate for this but I've never been a fan of Shakespeare. To me his work always seemed transparent and predictable.

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  2. Shakespeare's complete works is a great study of literature! Just try not to get hung up on EXACTLY what he possibly meant, and just enjoy the talent! Very nice sonnet.

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  3. I had to read this in English 101

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  4. where are the master pieces of poetry of Calvin & Hobbes ?

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  5. I think I used sonnet 44 for an english essay once.

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